Obesity Epidemic



Dr. Mehmet Oz and other top experts talk about why obesity is so strongly linked to the four major causes of death in the US-heart disease, cancer, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Discover the many disorders associated with obesity: infertility, back pain, Alzheimer's disease, sleep apnea, and more. Find out what your BMI is and why it matters. You'll see why our bodies aren't suited to our modern way of life. Learn how we respond to the wrong cues when we eat and ignore our natural, internal cues. Journey inside your blood vessels and see, on a microscopic level, exactly what happens when you overeat. Witness how fat cells transform from tiny individual cells into a massive tissue. How do we change the tide? Dieting is not the answer! You'll find out how to make little changes in your life that add up to big ones.

We all know Obesity can cause heart disease but that's just heart of the story. Excess fat demands extra blood, 75% of hypertension cases are caused by obesity. It is the leading cause of diabetes, 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese people are 3-4 times more likely to develop chronic kidney disease and 15% of all chronic kidney disease is caused by obesity. Obesity can lead to infertility and double your chances for miscarriage; also obese women are more likely to die giving birth. Obese men have a 30% higher chance of impotence while 8 out of 10 men with erectile dysfunction are overweight. Being only 10 pounds overweight increases the force on your knee by 40-60 pound with each step. Obese men double their chances of having a stroke and also increases your chances of arthritis, asthma, gourd, sleep apnea, gall stones, back disorders, breast cancers, cancer of the esophagus, colorectal cancer, kidney cancer, eye damage, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.

According to a new report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development released on September 23, 2010, Estimates from the survey by OECD reveal that people of the world's richest countries are getting fatter and fatter with the U.S. leading the change. According to the OECD report, two-thirds of the people in U.S. are overweight and about a third of the adults are obese which is defined as being nearly 30 pounds above normal weight.

In the last 25 years, Obesity in America has doubled to a third of America. That's about 60 million people that are obese. About 15% of our children are obese and the number is steadily growing.

Each year obesity causes at least 300,000 deaths in the US alone; Americans spend well over 100 billion dollars every year on obesity related healthcare. There are a lot of people who are having heart attacks despite all the efforts made to educate people about the ravages of obesity.

We know we eat too much junk and we just eat too much and we don't exercise like we should, but what exactly going on inside our bodies that makes us fat.

With real human data, cutting edge medical information and state of the art technology, we now have a whole new insight to obesity and the toll that takes on our bodies, from our expanding waist line right down to the cellular level.

Shortly after eating the circulatory system is already delivering vital nutrients and energy to the cells of our bodies, these nutrients are so small you would have to be the size of a red blood cell in order to see them. When our cells have more energy than they need our bodies store these nutrients, while immature fat cells begin absorbing this biological energy and transform it into a mature fat cells. The longer our body is supplied with access to nutrients the larger these cells become. As more and more are transformed, what was once just a tiny cell is now a massive tissue not only altering physical appearance but our physiological health.

Obesity is an epidemic that's not just a matter of how good we look in the mirror but truly a matter of life and death.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height.

Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active.

Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases


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The material on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any medical condition. Consult a licensed medical professional for the diagnosis and treatment of all medical conditions and before starting a new diet or exercise program. If you have a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.