Reuptake inhibitor


Neurotransmitter Reuptake Inhibitor : The SNRIs take advantage of serotonin's positive effects, plus add in benefits from blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine. These medications have been available since the early 1990s, and, like the SSRIs, are generously better tolerated, and safer in overdose than the tricyclics.

A reuptake inhibitor (RI), also known as a transporter blocker, is a drug that inhibits the plasmalemmal transporter-mediated reuptake of a neurotransmitter from the synapse into the pre-synaptic neuron, leading to an increase in the extracellular concentrations of the neurotransmitter and therefore an increase in neurotransmission. Various drugs utilize reuptake inhibition to exert their psychological and physiological effects, including many antidepressants and psychostimulants.

Most known reuptake inhibitors affect the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine (and epinephrine), and dopamine. However there are also a number of pharmaceuticals and research chemicals that act as reuptake inhibitors for other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, adenosine, choline (the precursor of acetylcholine), and the endocannabinoids, among others.


Related Images

Biology of depression
Biology of depression
Postpartum Depression
Postpartum Depression
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)
Depression (mood)

The material on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any medical condition. Consult a licensed medical professional for the diagnosis and treatment of all medical conditions and before starting a new diet or exercise program. If you have a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.