Triglyceride Molecule : Triglycerides are a large and varied category of fats found in both plants and animals. Our bodies convert excess dietary calories into triglycerides, which are then stored in the cells of fat tissue; these energy-rich triglycerides can then be released later into the bloodstream as needed. Most triglycerides in the blood are packaged in the form of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL); smaller quantities are carried in low-density lipoproteins (LDL or “bad” cholesterol) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL or “good” cholesterol).


Triglycerides are a type of fat found in your blood. Too much of this type of fat may raise the risk of coronary artery disease, especially in women.

A blood test measures your triglycerides along with your cholesterol. Normal triglyceride levels are below 150. Levels above 200 are high.

Factors that can raise your triglyceride level include

  • Being overweight
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Smoking
  • Excessive alcohol use
  • A very high carbohydrate diet
  • Certain diseases and medicines
  • Some genetic disorders

You may be able to lower your triglycerides with a combination of losing weight, diet, and exercise. You also may need to take medicine to lower your triglycerides.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

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